Events


NOV
13
Date:
Tuesday, 13 Nov 2018
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, 219 S Harrison Rd, East Lansing, MI 48824
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

 

Food production, and thus food security, is inherently linked to land use, as well as to energy and water resources, whether the food is produced from grains from croplands, livestock from rangelands, or seafood from aquaculture. Therefore, competition of land use for urban development and other non-agricultural uses has significant implications for food security. Food production relies on water availability and its temporal dynamics as crop growth and rangeland forage relies on soil moisture in root systems. This is changing as temperature and precipitation dynamics shift as local manifestations of climate change, and as a result of competition for water from other uses such as hydropower, residential and industrial demand, and other uses. Over the past decades, climate patterns have noticeably changed, leading to more frequent floods and severe droughts that devastate crops, affected fisheries and altered ecosystem services. At the same time, food production, processing and delivery continued relying heavily on the energy that provides power for agricultural irrigation, fertilization and transport. Furthermore, farmland is increasingly devoted to the production of biofuels, creating additional competition for land and complicating tradeoffs between water, energy and food security.

A systems approach is needed to address these global challenges that considers the nexus of water, energy, food and environment.  The Water-Energy-Food Nexus (WEF Nexus) describes the complex and inter-related nature of global resource systems. It means that the three goals — water security, energy security and food security — are inextricably linked and that changes in one area have impacts in one or both of the others. In this context, the WEF Nexus has emerged as a useful way to address the complex and interrelated issues of sustainable natural resource management. It provides a conceptual approach to better understand and systematically analyze the interactions between the natural environment and human activities in order to achieve optimal management strategies to meet sustainable development goals. By identifying and balancing the trade-offs among different stakeholders (sectors, communities and individuals) synergy can be achieved, allowing for more integrated and cost-effective planning, decision-making, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

Workshop Objectives

A number of WEF Nexus frameworks have been proposed but practical implementation of these frameworks must be further refined and case studies must be conducted to demonstrate the benefits and effectiveness for sustainable watershed management. The workshop objectives, therefore, are: 

  1. To share experiences and knowledge of water-energy-food nexus research from different disciplines, institutions and nations;
  2. To discuss current WEF Nexus frameworks and develop next steps to further validate and apply them to address practical issues related to water-energy-food securities;
  3. To identify gaps and priorities in future research in the area of water-energy-food securities and land use policies and steps to pursue future funding. 

Expected Outcomes

  1. Expanded / strengthened WEF Nexus network both on campus and internationally
  2. Development of a white paper on current state and future research, funding and collaborations
  3. Development of 2-3 preliminary proposal concepts with specific targeted funding agencies

 

NOV
14
Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
All day
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies
Read Event Details

An International Workshop on

Land Use, Policy and Water-Energy-Food Nexus:

Putting science to work for collaboration and problem solving

November 13-16, 2018

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA

 

BACKGROUND

 

Food production, and thus food security, is inherently linked to land use, as well as to energy and water resources, whether the food is produced from grains from croplands, livestock from rangelands, or seafood from aquaculture. Therefore, competition of land use for urban development and other non-agricultural uses has significant implications for food security. Food production relies on water availability and its temporal dynamics as crop growth and rangeland forage relies on soil moisture in root systems. This is changing as temperature and precipitation dynamics shift as local manifestations of climate change, and as a result of competition for water from other uses such as hydropower, residential and industrial demand, and other uses. Over the past decades, climate patterns have noticeably changed, leading to more frequent floods and severe droughts that devastate crops, affected fisheries and altered ecosystem services. At the same time, food production, processing and delivery continued relying heavily on the energy that provides power for agricultural irrigation, fertilization and transport. Furthermore, farmland is increasingly devoted to the production of biofuels, creating additional competition for land and complicating tradeoffs between water, energy and food security.

WORKSHOP SUB-THEMES

 

The Rural-Urban Nexus

Governance

Finance

Linking WEF scientific analysis to policy formulation

Capacity for sustainable WEF decision making

 

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES

 

A number of WEF Nexus frameworks have been proposed but practical implementation of these frameworks must be further refined and case studies must be conducted to demonstrate the benefits and effectiveness for sustainable watershed management. The workshop objectives, therefore, are:

 

  1. To share experiences and knowledge of water-energy-food nexus research from different disciplines, institutions and nations;
  2. To discuss current WEF Nexus frameworks and develop next steps to further validate and apply them to address practical issues related to water-energy-food securities;
  3. To identify gaps and priorities in future research in the area of water-energy-food securities and land use policies and steps to pursue future funding.

 

 

Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
All day
Location:
Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, 219 S Harrison Rd, East Lansing, MI 48824
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

Food production, and thus food security, is inherently linked to land use, as well as to energy and water resources, whether the food is produced from grains from croplands, livestock from rangelands, or seafood from aquaculture. Therefore, competition of land use for urban development and other non-agricultural uses has significant implications for food security. Food production relies on water availability and its temporal dynamics as crop growth and rangeland forage relies on soil moisture in root systems. This is changing as temperature and precipitation dynamics shift as local manifestations of climate change, and as a result of competition for water from other uses such as hydropower, residential and industrial demand, and other uses. Over the past decades, climate patterns have noticeably changed, leading to more frequent floods and severe droughts that devastate crops, affected fisheries and altered ecosystem services. At the same time, food production, processing and delivery continued relying heavily on the energy that provides power for agricultural irrigation, fertilization and transport. Furthermore, farmland is increasingly devoted to the production of biofuels, creating additional competition for land and complicating tradeoffs between water, energy and food security.

A systems approach is needed to address these global challenges that considers the nexus of water, energy, food and environment.  The Water-Energy-Food Nexus (WEF Nexus) describes the complex and inter-related nature of global resource systems. It means that the three goals — water security, energy security and food security — are inextricably linked and that changes in one area have impacts in one or both of the others. In this context, the WEF Nexus has emerged as a useful way to address the complex and interrelated issues of sustainable natural resource management. It provides a conceptual approach to better understand and systematically analyze the interactions between the natural environment and human activities in order to achieve optimal management strategies to meet sustainable development goals. By identifying and balancing the trade-offs among different stakeholders (sectors, communities and individuals) synergy can be achieved, allowing for more integrated and cost-effective planning, decision-making, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

Workshop Objectives

A number of WEF Nexus frameworks have been proposed but practical implementation of these frameworks must be further refined and case studies must be conducted to demonstrate the benefits and effectiveness for sustainable watershed management. The workshop objectives, therefore, are: 

  1. To share experiences and knowledge of water-energy-food nexus research from different disciplines, institutions and nations;
  2. To discuss current WEF Nexus frameworks and develop next steps to further validate and apply them to address practical issues related to water-energy-food securities;
  3. To identify gaps and priorities in future research in the area of water-energy-food securities and land use policies and steps to pursue future funding. 

Expected Outcomes

  1. Expanded / strengthened WEF Nexus network both on campus and internationally
  2. Development of a white paper on current state and future research, funding and collaborations
  3. Development of 2-3 preliminary proposal concepts with specific targeted funding agencies
Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
All day
Location:
MSU Main Library
Department:
Office for Education Abroad
Read Event Details

In honor of International Education Week 2018, the Passport Acceptance Facility in the MSU Main Library will be offering 1/2 off passport photos Tuesday through Thursday (11/13, 11/14, 11/15).

Photos are taken at the Hollander Service Desk located on 2 West during Service Desk Hours.

Visit their webpage for more information.

Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Location:
University Lutheran Church 1020 S Harrison Rd East Lansing MI 48823
Department:
Community Volunteers for International Programs
Read Event Details

CVIP Board will meet to discuss and act on recommendations of the CVIP Executive Committee

Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
International Center RM 204
Department:
Office for International Students and Scholars
Read Event Details

Have a tax question? Tax clinicians from the MSU College of Law Tax Clinic will be available to meet with you one-on-one to discuss tax-related issues. Please bring all your tax-related documents and all your visa-related documents. Tax walk-ins will take place each Wednesday between 11:30am and 1:30pm. Locations vary - check the OISS Calendar of Events for the room number before you go!

Michigan State University College of Law Alvin L. Storrs Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic caters to low-income taxpayers, including international students, who are in need of tax help. The Tax Clinic is comprised of both law students and supervising licensed attorneys. Information relating to the Clinic's clients is kept in strict confidence. You can find out more information about the clinic by visiting the website [http://www.law.msu.edu/clinics/tax.html] or by calling (517) 336-8088.

 
Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location:
International Center Room 201
Department:
Office of International Health and Safety
Read Event Details
The Office of International Health and Safety offers Critical Incident Management Seminars several times per year. All program directors and assistants must attend this year to learn more about our new partner International SOS.

Program Directors and Assistants may attend a seminar in person or virtually using MSU Zoom (RSVP requested for both). To RSVP, please email oihs(at)msu.edu
Date:
Wednesday, 14 Nov 2018
Time:
6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
203C Natural Science
Department:
Office for Education Abroad
NOV
15
Date:
Thursday, 15 Nov 2018
Time:
All day
Location:
Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, 219 S Harrison Rd, East Lansing, MI 48824
Department:
Asian Studies Center
Read Event Details

 

Food production, and thus food security, is inherently linked to land use, as well as to energy and water resources, whether the food is produced from grains from croplands, livestock from rangelands, or seafood from aquaculture. Therefore, competition of land use for urban development and other non-agricultural uses has significant implications for food security. Food production relies on water availability and its temporal dynamics as crop growth and rangeland forage relies on soil moisture in root systems. This is changing as temperature and precipitation dynamics shift as local manifestations of climate change, and as a result of competition for water from other uses such as hydropower, residential and industrial demand, and other uses. Over the past decades, climate patterns have noticeably changed, leading to more frequent floods and severe droughts that devastate crops, affected fisheries and altered ecosystem services. At the same time, food production, processing and delivery continued relying heavily on the energy that provides power for agricultural irrigation, fertilization and transport. Furthermore, farmland is increasingly devoted to the production of biofuels, creating additional competition for land and complicating tradeoffs between water, energy and food security.

A systems approach is needed to address these global challenges that considers the nexus of water, energy, food and environment.  The Water-Energy-Food Nexus (WEF Nexus) describes the complex and inter-related nature of global resource systems. It means that the three goals — water security, energy security and food security — are inextricably linked and that changes in one area have impacts in one or both of the others. In this context, the WEF Nexus has emerged as a useful way to address the complex and interrelated issues of sustainable natural resource management. It provides a conceptual approach to better understand and systematically analyze the interactions between the natural environment and human activities in order to achieve optimal management strategies to meet sustainable development goals. By identifying and balancing the trade-offs among different stakeholders (sectors, communities and individuals) synergy can be achieved, allowing for more integrated and cost-effective planning, decision-making, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

Workshop Objectives

A number of WEF Nexus frameworks have been proposed but practical implementation of these frameworks must be further refined and case studies must be conducted to demonstrate the benefits and effectiveness for sustainable watershed management. The workshop objectives, therefore, are: 

  1. To share experiences and knowledge of water-energy-food nexus research from different disciplines, institutions and nations;
  2. To discuss current WEF Nexus frameworks and develop next steps to further validate and apply them to address practical issues related to water-energy-food securities;
  3. To identify gaps and priorities in future research in the area of water-energy-food securities and land use policies and steps to pursue future funding. 

Expected Outcomes

  1. Expanded / strengthened WEF Nexus network both on campus and internationally
  2. Development of a white paper on current state and future research, funding and collaborations
  3. Development of 2-3 preliminary proposal concepts with specific targeted funding agencies

 

Date:
Thursday, 15 Nov 2018
Time:
All day
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies
Read Event Details
An International Workshop on
Land Use, Policy and Water-Energy-Food Nexus:
Putting science to work for collaboration and problem solving
 
November 13-16, 2018
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA
 
BACKGROUND
 
Food production, and thus food security, is inherently linked to land use, as well as to energy and water resources, whether the food is produced from grains from croplands, livestock from rangelands, or seafood from aquaculture. Therefore, competition of land use for urban development and other non-agricultural uses has significant implications for food security. Food production relies on water availability and its temporal dynamics as crop growth and rangeland forage relies on soil moisture in root systems. This is changing as temperature and precipitation dynamics shift as local manifestations of climate change, and as a result of competition for water from other uses such as hydropower, residential and industrial demand, and other uses. Over the past decades, climate patterns have noticeably changed, leading to more frequent floods and severe droughts that devastate crops, affected fisheries and altered ecosystem services. At the same time, food production, processing and delivery continued relying heavily on the energy that provides power for agricultural irrigation, fertilization and transport. Furthermore, farmland is increasingly devoted to the production of biofuels, creating additional competition for land and complicating tradeoffs between water, energy and food security.
 
WORKSHOP SUB-THEMES
  • The Rural-Urban Nexus
  • Governance
  • Finance
  • Linking WEF scientific analysis to policy formulation
  • Capacity for sustainable WEF decision making
 
WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES
 
A number of WEF Nexus frameworks have been proposed but practical implementation of these frameworks must be further refined and case studies must be conducted to demonstrate the benefits and effectiveness for sustainable watershed management. The workshop objectives, therefore, are:
 
 
To share experiences and knowledge of water-energy-food nexus research from different disciplines, institutions and nations;
To discuss current WEF Nexus frameworks and develop next steps to further validate and apply them to address practical issues related to water-energy-food securities;
To identify gaps and priorities in future research in the area of water-energy-food securities and land use policies and steps to pursue future funding.