Events


MAR
1
Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
All day
Location:
Online
Department:
Office of Study Abroad
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Applications for study abroad programs are accepted on a rolling basis, so the earlier you apply, the better!

 

The application deadline for most programs taking place during summer 2017,  fall 2017 or the 2017-18 academic year is March 1st.  

 

Some program deadlines will vary to be sure to check the individual program webpage.  Many programs will also fill up before the deadline, so remember to apply early! Once you have applied to your program, be sure to apply for the OSA scholarships.

 

To apply, login to the Study Abroad Student Portal and complete the online application.  You will have to create an account using your MSU NetID by clicking on the "Register" button on the left side of the screen. Once you have made your account, you will be able to begin your application. 

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
All day
Location:
Department:
Center for Gender in Global Context
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GenCen will be awarding one scholarship each to students attending the Women's & Gender Studies Study Abroad Programs in Malawi (Development and NGOs: Internships), London (Gender, Sex, and Feminism in the UK), and Amsterdam (Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity & Sexual Politics).

These scholarships, for $1,000-$1,250 each, are made possible by the Abbott–Haskin Endowment in even-numbered years and the Director's Challenge Campaign in odd-numbered years. Students are eligible to apply if they are:

  1. In a Women's & Gender Studies degree program (WGS major/minor or LGBTQ minor)
  2. Have at least a 3.0 GPA
  3. "Have demonstrated the capacity to make a difference in public service upon graduation."

    [Administrative Note: In 2016, per the Abbott-Haskin Endowment, we included a requirement that applicants be rising juniors, juniors, or seniors. However, for the 2017 application season we have removed this eligibility requirement.]

Applications Must Include:

  • A cover letter expressing interest in the scholarship, how the study abroad program furthers their scholarly interests, and how they plan to use their women's and gender studies degree after graduation
  • A resume or CV
  • Proof of acceptance to one of the listed WGS Study Abroad programs
  • Preference will be given to students demonstrating financial need; materials in support of demonstrating such need are encouraged as applicable.

Application Deadline:
Please email application materials to gencen(at)msu.edu by March 15; preference will be given to applications submitted by March 1.

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
2:30 a.m. to 3:30 a.m.
Location:
MSU HUB located at D101 Wells Hall
Department:
Visiting International Professional Program
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Design Thinking is an active problem solving process that can be applied across many different disciplines.  This session will engage participants in a design thinking activity, which will lead to a discussion that will provide insight into how the process can be used.  Leigh will also discuss ways design thinking processes have been used in curriculum development projects in the MSU Hub. Participants will consider how to employ similar methods in their own work with projects, students and teams.

Sign up here!

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Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Erickson Hall Room 133G
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Preparing for careers in international education development: Working in an international organization, NGO, foundation, and other non-university-based settings

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location:
201 International Center
Department:
Latin American Studies Center
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In the 1970s, Chile was a pioneer in the general, worldwide transition to neoliberalism. Chilean neoliberalism was also infamous for its violence and repression, as it was instituted under the bloody military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990).  The violent repression of the dictatorship underscores the anti-democratic nature of neoliberalism's free market fundamentalism and its radical state retrenchment.  Yet even in Chile, neoliberalism's path was neither entirely straightforward nor free from popular pressure.  This talk explores the transition to neoliberalism through an examination of an iconic and controversial site in Santiago, Chile, the Parque Arauco.  This area was initially designed as a modernist, working class neighborhood before the dictatorship and subsequently became a high-end shopping mall following neoliberal reforms.  The trajectory of the Parque Arauco reveals both why Chile deserves its iconic status as a trailblazing model for neoliberalism and how neoliberalism must also be understood as contingent and partially responsive to social pressures.    

Ed Murphy, Associate Professor of History and Global Urban Studies

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
JMC Library, 3rd Floor Case Hall
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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The territorial division of the Indian subcontinent into India and Pakistan, and eventually Bangladesh, is referred to as "Partition" in English. Indian languages have their own terms to describe this phenomenon and quite often, victims of this history provide in their oral testimonies versions that complicate the singularity of this event even further. My talk will provide the dialectics between history and memory, state and individuals to show how this "event" is constructed and remembered in diverse ways in India. I will focus largely on my research on Sindh and how its minorities migrated to India during Partition, their processes of rehabilitation and resettlement and also compare them with Sindhi speaking Muslims who have lived along the borders of Kutch and Rajasthan in India to argue that negotiation of borders is an everyday practice for some. Finally partition reincarnates itself through border making and border crossing practices in the subcontinent. I examine this in relation to language, literature, religion and nations at large.


Rita Kothari is a professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India. She is the author of Translating India: The Cultural Politics of English (St. Jerome Publishing, Manchester, rvd ed. Cambridge University Press, New Delhi) and The Burden of Refuge (rvd.ed. Orient Blackswan, New Delhi). She has co-translated Modern Gujarati Poetry (Sahitya Akademi, Delhi) and Coral Island: The Poetry of Niranjan Bhagat (Sahitya Akademi, Gandhinagar). Her translations of note are The Stepchild: Angaliayat (Oxford University Press, New Delhi), Speech and Silence: Literary Journeys by Gujarati Women (Zubaan, New Delhi) and Unbordered Memories: Partition Stories from Sindh (Penguin). She has co-edited Decentring Translation Studies: India and Beyond (John Benjamin Press, Amsterdam) and Chutnefying English: The Phenomenon of Hinglish (Penguin, forthcoming).

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
International Center, Room 204
Department:
Office for International Students and Scholars
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Have a tax question? Tax clinicians from the MSU College of Law Tax Clinic will be available to meet with you one-on-one to discuss tax-related issues. Please bring all your tax-related documents and all your visa-related documents.

More about the clinic: Michigan State University College of Law Alvin L. Storrs Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic caters to low-income taxpayers, including international students, who are in need of tax help. The Tax Clinic is comprised of both law students and supervising licensed attorneys. Information relating to the Clinic's clients is kept in strict confidence. You can find out more information about the clinic by visiting the website or by calling (517) 336-8088.

 

Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Part of the Asian Studies Center Colloquium on Transnational East Asia

"Translation, Mysterious Others and Transference: Religious Subjectifications from the Experience of the Northeast Japan Disaster"

Six years have passed since Northeast Japan was hit by the triple disaster. But people in Northeast Japan have been aching in their hearts, and their indescribable experiences force us to rethink the theory of religious subjectification. The process of religious subjectification sheds light on the act of translation and transference when we think of our relationship with the dead. The dead take on the roles of mysterious others in Lacanian sense in order to construct our subjectivity. This talk explains how the experience of the triple disaster's survivors allows us to find new ways of understanding subjectivity and to theorize the unique characteristics of 'religious' subjectification.
 
Jun'ichi Isomae is professor at International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto, Japan. He holds a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from the University of Tokyo. He is the author of Shisha no Zawameki Hisaichi Shinko-ron [Disquiet Voices of the Dead in Northeast Japan Disaster] (Tokyo: Kawadeshobo-shinsha, 2015), Religious Discourse in Modern Japan: Religion, State, and Shinto (Brill, 2014), and Japanese Mythology: Hermeneutics on Scripture (Equinox Publishing, 2010).
 
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Center
Co-sponsors: Asian Pacific American Studies Program, Department of History, Department of Religious Studies, Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities, Japan Council
Date:
Wednesday, 01 Mar 2017
Time:
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location:
305 International Center
Department:
Asian Studies Center
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Arabic Diwan is a gathering of Arabic students who are in the Arabic program, where they speak hte language and learn about the culture in a relaxed environemnt with our Fulbright teaching assistant. Students from all Arabic language levels are encouraged to attend. Also, we extend the invitation to the Arabic-speaking students at the English Center.

MAR
2
Date:
Thursday, 02 Mar 2017
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
201 International Center
Department:
African Studies Center
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"African Agency in the Making of a British Colony: A Microhistorical Analysis," presented by Joseph Bangura, Associate Professor and Chair of Hitory at Kalamazoo College.